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Hula Hula River

Length:  8 Days

Price: $5,800

 Begins and Ends in Fairbanks

The Hula Hula River starts high in the most rugged mountain peaks Arctic National Wildlife Refuge has to offer. If you are looking for a river to float in the Brooks Range that provides entertaining, but not challenging white water, steep mountains to hike, and a step up in adventure from the gentle Kongakut River, this is the trip for you. The upper river is narrower than the Kongakut and mountains are closer to the river, which provides stunning views and closer wildlife viewing, as we navigate down the river.

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The wildlife viewing on this river is second to none. For example, one trip we floated through the migrating Porcupine caribou herd for an entire week, 300,000 animals strong. Where ever there is prey, that means close by will follow the predators. So keep your camera and binoculars ready as wolves and grizzly bear, will be close by. We have seen many times wolves and bears, chase down and kill caribou. Floating the Hula Hula,you just never know what experience you will have.

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We’ve seen a wolf battle an old Musk Ox and kill it right in front of us, but driven away moments later by two aggressive golden eagles which repeatedly dive bombed the wolf until it ran away. This kind of experience is what captures the imagination of visitors and provides life long memories to be shared with family and friends. The lower half of the Hula Hula, flows out into the coastal plain of the Arctic slope.

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This is where the majority of the wildlife will be seen as the landscape is perfect for grazing. This area has been labeled as “the Serengeti of the north.” Clients who have seen both the wildebeest migration in Tanzania and Kenya have raved about the wildlife experience after their Hula Hula float. From the take out you can see pack ice on the Arctic Ocean, you are as far north as you can get before actually floating out into the sea. Kaktovik on Barter Island, is within rowing distance but you have to go out into the Arctic Ocean and go along the shore for several miles to get there.

 

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“Floating through the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge,  was even more amazing than going on safari in Africa.”  

~Author of Eyes of a Tiger, 2 star General, and Ouzel client  Arthur Clark

 

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